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Mineral oil in chocolate Santa Clauses: Foodwatch warns again


Foodwatch: Mineral oil found to be hazardous to health in Chocolate Santa Clauses
The consumer protection organization Foodwatch has found a hazardous substance in Christmas confectionery in a laboratory analysis. Mineral oils suspected of being cancer were found in chocolate nicholas. The organization calls on politicians to better protect consumers.

Mineral oil in Christmas confectionery
Findings of mineral oil in food are reported again and again. In recent years, mineral oil residues have been found, for example, in Advent calendars and in chocolate Easter bunnies. And in summer, the news of mineral oil discoveries in Ferrero's “children's bar” went around. Even if the health hazards of these substances are repeatedly pointed out, the situation does not seem to improve: Mineral oils have been found in Christmas confectionery again.

Contaminated Chocolate Santa Clauses
As the consumer organization Foodwatch announces in a recent announcement, two chocolate Santa Clauses sold at Edeka are contaminated with cancer-suspect mineral oils.

In addition, the laboratory tests commissioned by Foodwatch showed that 13 other Christmas candies contained saturated mineral oils. Positive: The loads have decreased compared to previous tests.

Two products affected by Edeka
According to the information, the "Gut & Günstig Schokoladen-Weihnachtsmann" from Edeka and the "Friedel Weihnachtsmann Schokolinsen" from Rübezahl, which is also sold by Edeka, are affected.

Analysis of both revealed aromatic mineral oils (MOAH), which are considered to be potentially carcinogenic and genotoxic. In addition, saturated mineral oils (MOSH) were found in the two products, which accumulate in the body and can damage the organs.

Foodwatch asked manufacturers to publicly recall the affected products.

Mineral oil contamination can be avoided
A total of 20 Christmas sweets, from chocolate products to gingerbread, were tested. Find the results here.

According to Foodwatch, mineral oil pollution has decreased compared to previous tests. Shortly before Easter, analyzes showed aromatic mineral oils in eight out of 20 chocolate bunnies - proof for the consumer protection organization that mineral oil contamination can be avoided if the manufacturers only want it.

"The confectionery industry is obviously able to ban mineral oils from their products if public pressure is high enough," said Johannes Heeg, campaigner at Foodwatch.

Politics are in demand
"Federal Food Minister Christian Schmidt must finally make all food manufacturers responsible and introduce binding limit values ​​in order to protect consumers from these completely unnecessary health risks," said Heeg.

Foodwatch demands strict maximum values ​​for saturated mineral oils (MOSH) in all foods and a zero tolerance for the particularly critical aromatic mineral oils (MOAH).

Mineral oils get into the chocolate through the packaging
Mineral oils can get into chocolate in a number of ways, including jute sacks used to transport cocoa beans that are treated with mineral oils; About machine oils used in production or about exhaust fumes from industry and traffic.

Waste paper packaging is also a common source. In addition to mineral oil-containing printing inks, waste paper contains up to 250 other chemicals that can be transferred to the food if recycling cartons are used as food packaging, during transport or when storing the raw materials. (ad)

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