News

A diet with a high percentage of whole grains protects against many chronic diseases


Diabetes, high blood pressure and Co: whole grain protects against diseases
A diet that mainly relies on whole grains is healthy. There is a lot of fiber, vitamins, oils and minerals in the barely treated grain. A study has now shown how healthy whole grains really are. According to the researchers, it is used to prevent diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

Prevent diseases with whole grains
Whole grains are healthy: A scientific study by the “Harvard Medical School” in the United States found years ago that whole grains can prevent diabetes. In addition, the numerous fibers it contains can stimulate digestion and prevent constipation. According to a study by the University Hospital of Lausanne in Switzerland, high-fiber food can also alleviate asthma. A new study by an international team of researchers has now found that a diet rich in whole grains can protect against many more diseases.

Risk of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes decreases
As the scientists at Imperial College London report in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), people who eat a lot of whole grains have a lower risk of developing serious diseases such as cancer or cardiovascular diseases. The researchers also found that this reduces the risk of stroke or death from diabetes or respiratory diseases. According to a statement from the university, the authors recommend "increasing the intake of whole grains and choosing as much whole grains as possible instead of refined grains".

Longer life with more servings every day
The scientists found that if you ate one serving (16 grams) of whole grain a day, you would reduce your risk of death by seven percent for the next six years. The probability of cardiovascular death is reduced by nine percent, that of cancer death by five percent. An even clearer correlation was found with the daily consumption of three servings of whole grains. The overall risk of death for the next six years decreased by 20 percent, the risk of cardiovascular death by 25 percent, and the likelihood of dying from cancer decreased by 14 percent. Dr. Dagfinn Aune, of the School of Public Health at the Imperial, said these "results support nutritional recommendations to increase whole grain consumption for the population, thereby reducing the risk of chronic illness and premature mortality." (ad)

Author and source information



Video: Let Food Be Thy Medicine (December 2021).