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Meat consumption increases the risk of dementia


Meat consumption: Saturated fatty acids increase the risk of dementia

It has long been known that high meat consumption can increase the risk of heart disease and cancer. However, the frequent consumption of meat can not only harm physical, but also mental health, as US researchers recently reported. In addition, saturated fatty acids, such as those found in meat, increase the risk of dementia.

Dementia cannot be cured

It has been shown for years that the number of people with dementia continues to rise. Currently, more than 1.5 million people are affected in this country, most of them have Alzheimer's. Despite medical progress, dementia cannot be cured to this day. The therapies currently available can only slow down the disease process and alleviate accompanying symptoms. However, an international team of researchers reported that around a third of dementia cases could be prevented if nine specific risk factors were eliminated from childhood. They did not mention the consumption of meat. But as Chinese scientists found in a meta-study, meat consumption also increases the risk of dementia.

Prevent Alzheimer's

The nine identified risk factors for dementia by the international research team are hearing loss in middle age, lack of education in adolescence, smoking, depression, lack of exercise, social isolation, high blood pressure, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

However, various scientific studies have shown that nutrition also plays an important role in preventing Alzheimer's.

For example, there is evidence that Mediterranean food can protect us from dementia.

Extra virgin olive oil also lowers the risk of Alzheimer's.

On the other hand, the risk can also increase due to improper nutrition. For example, British scientists found that heavy alcohol consumption enormously increases the risk of dementia.

And Chinese researchers have now found that eating saturated fat also increases the risk of Alzheimer's and dementia.

High intake of saturated fats increases the risk of illness

As the scientists from Zhejiang University in Hangzhou (China) report in the journal "Current Alzheimer Research", epidemiological studies showed a connection between the amount of fats eaten and Alzheimer's disease, but this association remained rather inconsistent.

The researchers therefore searched the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library medical databases for publications up to May 2017 and included 8,630 participants and 633 cases from four independent prospective cohort studies in the meta-analysis.

It was shown that a higher intake of saturated fatty acids (which are mainly contained in animal fats) increased the risk of Alzheimer's disease by 39 percent and the risk of dementia even by 105 percent.

A dose-response analysis showed that a 4 g / day increase in saturated fat intake was associated with a 15 percent higher risk of Alzheimer's.

However, no significant association between total fat intake or mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (i.e. vegetable fats) and the risk of Alzheimer's or dementia was found.

The researchers conclude: "This meta-analysis provides significant evidence for a positive association between higher saturated fat intake and risk of Alzheimer's and dementia." (Ad)

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