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Almost 60 kilos: Doctors remove a giant tumor from a woman's stomach


Doctors in the United States remove a 60-kilogram tumor from a woman's abdomen

In the United States, doctors removed a giant tumor from a woman's abdomen. The tumor on the ovaries had grown to 60 kilograms. The patient was severely malnourished because the tumor pressed on her digestive tract. Now the woman is fine again.

Huge ovarian tumor removed

In the United States, a 38-year-old woman had a 60-kilogram tumor removed from her stomach. The operation took place at Danbury Hospital, Connecticut. The clinic, which is part of the Western Connecticut Health Network (WCHN), said it was one of the largest known ovarian tumors. The patient was discharged from the hospital just two weeks after the procedure.

The patient was extremely malnourished

According to the information, the American had gained about five kilos every week for two months without being able to explain how this could have happened.

When she went to see a doctor, computer tomography (CT) showed a large growth on her ovaries.

Her gynecologist therefore referred her to Dr. Vaagn Andikyan, a gynecological oncologist and assistant professor at Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont, who gave the patient hope but could hardly believe what he saw:

"When I met the patient, she was extremely malnourished because the tumor was on her digestive tract," said the specialist.

The woman even used a wheelchair because of the tumor weight. "I wanted to help her," said Dr. Andikyan.

Doctors were worried about the woman's heart

Dr. Andikyan assembled a team of nearly 25 highly qualified clinical specialists to plan how the tumor can be removed.

"Comprehensive preoperative planning was crucial because there were many imponderables and hurdles to overcome," the message said.

And further: "Within two weeks, the team developed and practiced plans for five possible scenarios."

The team suspected that the tumor that had affected the patient's entire abdomen was benign; however, they could not be safe without further testing.

The cardiovascular experts at Danbury Hospital were critical to the treatment plan because the tumor was on a large blood vessel and they were concerned about the patient's heart.

The patient was quickly released from the clinic

Finally, in a five-hour operation, both the woman's tumor and left ovary were removed - as well as part of the excess skin that had been stretched by the tumor.

The patient's abdomen was reconstructed. According to the doctors, the tumor is now being genetically examined. This is to find out why it had grown so quickly in such a short time.

The woman was able to leave the hospital two weeks after the operation. The experts assume that she will recover completely.

Removal of giant tumors

For years, the removal of gigantic tumors has been reported time and again. In 2013, for example, a 17-kilo tumor was removed from a patient's ovaries in the women's clinic at the Lübbecke-Rahden hospital (North Rhine-Westphalia).

And a woman from Costa Rica had a 34-kilo tumor removed from her stomach just a few months ago.

The world's largest tumor removed by surgery weighed 90 kilograms. This was removed in early 2012 by an international team of doctors in a 13-hour operation on a man from Vietnam.

Cut only half away

Also in Vietnam, the partial removal of a giant tumor was carried out on a 34-year-old man.

As the state news agency VNA reports, doctors in Hanoi have removed half of the giant ulcer from the patient.

"During the first surgery, the doctors cut the tumor on the patient's back and buttocks, weighing 23 kg," said Dr. Đào Văn Giang, a member of the operations team.

The rest of the originally 45-kilo tumor, which had spread to the buttocks, back and almost the entire left thigh, should be removed when the patient's health has improved.

Cutting everything together in one operation "could have endangered the patient's life," said the doctors. (ad)

Author and source information

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